How much Oxygen do my House Plants Produce?

How much Oxygen does my House Plant Produce?

It's now common knowledge that house plants render a whole host of benefits to the people that surround them. These benefits include reducing stress, increasing productivity and cleaning the air.


Just how much oxygen do indoor plants give off?

Before answering this question, let's take a quick look at the process that house plants follow in generating oxygen. 
 
During the daytime, most indoor plants absorb carbon dioxide from the ambient environment and use the gas to photosynthesize, to create food from light. In the process, oxygen is released. This gaseous exchange happens through tiny pores which are usually located on the underside of the plant leaf. Giving off oxygen during daytime hours is thus something that plants quite naturally do to survive.

Do Indoor Plants make a difference to the oxygen levels in the home?


Humans consume around 50 liters of oxygen per hour and each plant leaf gives off about five milliliters of oxygen per hour. We would need 500-700 averaged sized house plants to fully support the oxygen needs of a human within an air tight room. 
 
Scientists say that 100 plants would, however, make a substantial difference to the oxygen levels in the home. It would seem that the oxygen generating effectiveness of your houseplants depends on the indoor plant aesthetic that you've created - whether you like living in an urban jungle or a more plant-minimalist space.

Which house plants are the best at producing oxygen?


Some plants are more effective in generating oxygen than others. Here's a list of some of the more 'generous' oxygen givers:
- Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum) 
- Snake Plant (Sansevieria) 
- Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens)
- Barberton Daisy (Gerbera)
- Christmas Cactus (Schlumbergera)
and Aloe Vera.
 
Luckily, all of these indoor plants are available in South Africa. Give us a shout to help you source any of them!
 
Got any thoughts on oxygen and plants? Pop them in the comment section below, we'd be happy to hear from you!
 





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  • July 21, 2017
  • Andreas Keller

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