Hoya Carnosa 'Tricolor'

Scientific name: Hoya Carnosa ‘Tricolor’
Synonyms: Wax Plant, Porcelain Flower, Wax vine

Hoya’s are going through a revival, they have left the dusty days of our grandmother's kitchens behind them,found their way into our more modernized lifestyles, and we have welcomed them with zest.Native to tropical Asia hoya’s are perfectly suited for your urban jungle. The Hoya Carnosa ‘Tricolor’, an offshoot of the common Carnosa species, has pink slender stems with pink, white and deep green succulent leaves. Wax plants are found vining along trees and cascading out of available crevices. Owing to their epiphytic nature they have the ability to draw nutrients and moisture out of the warm damp jungle air.  These are truly majestic houseplants that are a must have for any plant collection.

NOTE: Hoya’s contain a latex that can be a skin irritant for pets and humans.

  Common Symptoms

  • Yellow/scorched leaves: Hoya Carnosa ‘Tricolor’ loves bright light but not direct sunlight, if your hoya is bleaching yellow and dropping leaves this is an indication that it is receiving too much light, direct sunlight can also cause your leaves to scorch. Rectify this by relocating your plant and making sure it is receiving adequate light without it being direct.
  • No flowers/only dark green leaves: If you have noticed that your Hoya keeps making plain dark green leaves and will not bloom this is an indication that your plant is not receiving enough bright light. Relocate your hoya to a brighter position without placing it in direct sunlight.
  • Wrinkled/ Crisp leaves: This is a sign that your hoya is not receiving enough water. Your plant should be allowed to dry out but prolonged dryness can weaken your plant and cause disease. Adjust your frequency of watering and do not allow your hoya to stay dry for long periods of time. 
  • Soft yellowing leaves: Hoya have succulent leaves that retain moisture. For this reason, they do not like to stay wet and prefer that their soil dry out between waterings. Check that your planter is draining correctly and adjust your watering schedule accordingly.
  • Flower buds drop prematurely: There are many factors that can cause flowers to drop the main being temperature fluctuations and low or lack of humidity.  Wax plants like warm moist conditions , so be sure your plant is not receiving a cool draft. If dry air is the main factor consider spritzing your indoor plants several times a week or relocating your plant to a more humid environment like the kitchen or bathroom, as long as it is warm.
  • Pests: Mealybug are the most common pest to infest Hoya but they are susceptible to spider mite as well. If you do get an infestation check for any environmental factors that could be causing stress to your plant and adjust. Use a good quality organic pest control to keep infestations in check.

Care Instructions

  • Origin: Eastern Asia
  • Height: 2m indoors and 6m in its natural habitat .
  • Light: Bright Indirect light.
  • Water: Water once your potting mix is dry to the touch.
  • Humidity: Medium to high humidity is ideal.
  • Temperature: Ideal temperatures range from 16°C - 21°C.
  • Soil: A well draining organic potting mix is sufficient.
  • Fertilizer: Use a diluted well balanced organic fertilizer once every 2 weeks. Cease fertilization during winter.
  • Repotting: It is best to repot once your Hoya has reached capacity in their current container, they do prefer being root-bound but if growth has stopped, repot in a planter one size larger using a good quality potting mix.
  • Propagation: These plants are some of the easiest to propagate from stem cuttings in spring. Take cuttings of 8 - 10cm just below a set of leaves. Dip the cut end in rooting hormone and press into a well draining potting mix. Keep moist until cutting has established and started pushing out new growth.